Chaharshanbe soori of Iran

Chaharshanbe Souri

Chaharshanbe soori of Iran

🕒 2 minute read

Happy Chaharshanbe Soori.
Chaharshanbe Souri is an Iranian festival celebrated on the eve of the last Tuesday nights of the year before Nowruz.  The Persian name of the festival consists of čahāršanbe, the name of Wednesday in the Iranian Calendar, and suri, most plausibly meaning “red” and referring either to Fire or to ruddiness.
Jumping over the fire
Before the start of the festival, people gather brushwood in an open, free exterior space. At sunset, after making one or more bonfires, they jump over the flames, singing sorxi-ye to az man, zardi-ye man az to, literally meaning “[let] your ruddiness be mine, my paleness yours”, or a local equivalent of it.

This is considered a purificatory practice.  The festival has its origin in ancient Iranian rituals. The ancient Iranians celebrated the festival of Hamaspathmaedaya (Hamaspaθmaēdaya), the last five days of the year (Panjeh*) in honor of the spirits of those who have passed away, which is today referred to as Farvardinegan. They believed that the spirits of the beloved ones would come for a reunion at the dawn of the 1st day of.

The festival has its origin in ancient Iranian rituals. The ancient Iranians celebrated the festival of Hamaspathmaedaya (Hamaspaθmaēdaya), the last five days of the year (Panjeh*) in honor of the spirits of those who have passed away, which is today referred to as Farvardinegan. They believed that the spirits of the beloved ones would come for a reunion at the dawn of the 1st day of Panjeh.

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